A new museum in Poland will showcase the work of Polish Christians during the Holocaust, reports Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

The Saint John Paul II Memory and Identity Museum will display more than 40,000 accounts of Polish Christians who risked their lives and rescued their Jewish countrymen during World War II.

The museum will fill an important gap in our museum offerings, which still does not sufficiently cover both the axiology of John Paul II and the issues of Polish-Jewish relations during World War II. —Minister of Culture Piotr Gliński

The museum aims to curate artifacts of the history of early Polish Christians, spanning over 1,000 years. The Polish Ministry of Culture and National Heritage will donate $22 million to help the museum gather and preserve these valuable mementos.

Located in Toruń, northern Poland, the museum will highlight stories of people who witnessed the heroic deeds of Polish Christians who rescued Jews from persecution by the Nazi regime. The Lux Veritatis Foundation, which has collected these accounts since 1995, will run the operation of the museum.

In a statement, Minister of Culture Piotr Gliński said, “The museum will fill an important gap in our museum offerings, which still does not sufficiently cover both the axiology of John Paul II and the issues of Polish-Jewish relations during World War II.”

In the study Europe’s Young Adults and Religion, Poland is named the most religious country. Researchers surveyed 16- to 29-year olds in 12 countries in Europe and found that more than 10% of the respondents in Poland attend services at least once a week, according to The Guardian.

Sources:
Jewish Telegraph Agency
The Telegraph

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